Surgical or homemade, masks mark a major shift in thinking

Health 2020/6/5

Surgical or homemade, masks mark a major shift in thinking

People wearing sanitary masks walk in Via Condotti shopping street, in Rome, Italy, Monday, May 18, 2020. Italy is slowly lifting sanitary restrictions after a two-month coronavirus lockdown. (Cecilia Fabiano/LaPresse via AP)

Surgical or homemade, masks mark a major shift in thinking

A council worker wearing a face mask to protect against coronavirus, collects refuse at Parliament Square, in London, Monday, May 18, 2020. Britain´s Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced last Sunday that people could return to work if they could not work from home. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali)

Surgical or homemade, masks mark a major shift in thinking

A waiter wearing a face mask carries a tray at the Versailles restaurant and pastry shop in Lisbon, Monday, May 18, 2020. Some cafes and restaurants are reopening in Portugal on Monday. The government is gradually easing measures introduced to stem the spread of the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)

BRUSSELS (AP) — Think about Hannibal Lecter, the psychopathic cannibal in the “Silence of The Lambs." Or Jason Voorhees, the hockey mask-wearing murderer in the “Friday the 13th" slasher film series.

Before the coronavirus outbreak abruptly disrupted the livelihoods of millions of people, the sight of masks worn in public spaces in the Western world conjured up images of malevolent clowns and terrifying fictional villains.

Even worse, in the streets of Paris, London or Brussels, mask-wearing — a long-accepted measure in some Asian cities — would often trigger unease and angst related to real-life traumatic bloodshed orchestrated by balaclava-led commandos from extremist groups.

France banned the wearing of full veils in public places back in 2011 in part because the government said the face covering violated the nation&

0 0 Feedback
  • Your feedback has been submitted
Comments